Artisans Program: We work directly with women artisans who are experts in their culture’s traditional craft-making to create contemporary wares exclusive to Daughters Rising.

 

Why we work with Women

The World Bank calls investing in women in the third world “smart economics” because research shows it has a multiplier effect. Studies have indicated that when women hold assets or gain income, the money is more likely to be spent on nutrition, medicine and housing. Women are more likely to share their economic gains with their families and communities at large. When women and girls earn income, they reinvest 90% of it into their families, as compared to only 30-40% for a man.* By financially empowering mothers in areas at risk of trafficking you are also helping prevent their young daughters from needing to bring in income, therefore helping them to stay in school longer, and lessening their risk of being sold into slavery.

Our model aims to move away from NGO dependence and instead allow women to be responsible and independent. For example, salaries are provided rather than handouts, housing, or food. Woman budget their own money and live with freedom, respect, and dignity.

Ancient technique meets modern design

We collaborate with women already producing traditional crafts to create new products geared towards a global audience. Women artisans are able to use skills they already know, and often work from home, incorporating craft-making into their daily domestic life. We then buy those products for above Fair Trade prices and sell them on our online RISE UP shop. Through modern design, we look to produce goods that transcend charity purchases or souvenirs and rather create beautiful products that compliment a sophisticated palette.

 

Each product has a story

We bring the stories of the artisans, and their beautiful handiwork, to a global audience while paying them wages that reflect the excellent quality of their craftsmanship and time spent creating. By producing goods for a global customer, our artisans gain invaluable knowledge of how to produce for foreign markets, a knowledge which allows them to work with other designers and projects in the future.

 

* Chris Fortson, “Women’s Rights Vital for Developing World,” Yale News Daily 2003.